Will the REAL Trent Dilfer please stand up?


For many years, a common nickname for me during football season has been “Dilfer”.  This began when Trent Dilfer burst onto the NFL scene in the early nineties with the Tampa Bay Bucs, and continues today as he is seemingly on ESPN 24×7 talking football.  True Story – in my mid-twenties, I made my way through a night club red rope or 2 in the Tampa area as a result of this resemblance.  “Welcome Mr. Dilfer, right this way…” 

Not all look-a-likes are created equal

When it comes to acquiring new customers, I often advise my clients to build RFM analytic models that examine their existing clients across many dimensions, resulting in a segmentation that quickly identifies their “best” customers.  From this point, the statistical factors that define the top performing customers can be applied to databases of consumers (or businesses), looking for prospects that most resemble the best customers.

While this provides great results and should be part of any serious marketer’s arsenal of approaches, the ongoing explosion of data worldwide is changing the game a bit.

MJD vs. Dilfer - Tale of the Tape

It’s the differences, dummy

Data points related to sentiment and intent are harder to identify, but are proving that the differences in our customers are sometimes more important than the similarities.

Do you agree?  Let’s discuss at #DMA2011 in Boston next week – DMA 2011

Advertisements

What’s in your Marketing Kitchen?


Bakers, Chefs, or Cooks?  

I think we can all agree that each of these descriptions invoke a different image, expectation of skills,  and a perception of the experience they will deliver.  My wife is clearly a Baker, based on her use of recipes, measuring spoons, and timers, sprinkled with creativity [and powdered sugar].  Chefs are the people we see on TV, with all of their fancy schoolin’ and gastronomic techniques, but ironically, as they gain notoriety, most seem to spend less time in actual kitchens.  Generally speaking, Chefs and Bakers might both be considered the same, but working in different mediums.  Now, as a self-described Cook, I admit I may review several recipes (or pictures), see something on TV, or scan the pantry shelves and refrigerator taking a silent inventory.  But when the moment strikes, I just start start cooking, making adjustments along the way.

A dash of this, a pinch of that – VOILA – dinner is served!

The Marketing Kitchen

When it comes to working on the line in a Marketing Kitchen, the Bakers, Chefs, and Cooks are often at odds when it comes to deciding how to create an award-winning dish.  The Bakers want to plan for every scenario, test and re-test, and generally have 100% certainty of success before actually beginning.  The Chefs are a little more pragmatic, but tend to focus on the technical tasks of the project, resulting in an over-engineered solution.  The Chef often uses too many ingredients, too many techniques, and is over-ambitious as it relates to time lines [ever seen someone on TV try to make Risotto in 10 mins?].

While Cooks may not possess the exacting standards of a Baker, or the training and techniques of a Chef, we are often the x-factor in the Kitchen’s success.  The Cook’s ability to combine disparate ingredients, improvise kitchen tools and techniques, keep an eye on the clock, and take calculated risks, more often leads to a successful dish (and a happy diner).

This leads me to the conclusion that in today’s ever-evolving Marketing + Technology marketplace, we need more Cooks than Chefs or Bakers – except when it’s time for dessert.

Sweet.

%d bloggers like this: