With the sprouting of gray hairs…


With the sprouting of gray hairs comes the realization that life is changing. First it was the reading glasses and now the gray hairs in my beard. This got me thinking about how my life today is different from a year ago not to mention 5, 10, or 15 years ago, and how much it will continue to change in the future. Fast forward through the sentimental and philosophical and you end up with the simple notion that:

“People need stuff and that stuff changes depending on their Lifestage”.

It Doesn’t Take a Genius
Marketers have known this for years and I take no credit for pointing this out. Many have gone to great lengths to create tools and methodologies to capture new clients whose journey through life is punctuated with events that ultimately define their needs (“needs” are very subjective and a whole ‘nother story). Life events include things like getting married, buying a home, having children, getting divorced (for more than 50% of U.S. society), becoming an empty-nester, and finally becoming a senior whose only interest seems to be spoiling the grandchildren and driving with a turn signal on. Let’s just say that my neighbor and I are both buying diapers but for different reasons – talk about cradle to grave, right?

Successfully reaching these consumers and getting them to buy your product or service depends on your ability to deliver a relevant, timely and compelling message in the appropriate and desired channel, which might include direct mail, email, mobile, social, search, or display.

Lifestage + Channel
This is a topic with increasing interest as of late – just this past week I read a MediaPost article that talks specifically about marketing to new parents in the mobile space. Apparently new parents are the group most likely to be responsive to mobile marketing. Some could guess that the lifestyle of those with young children is chaotic and thus making this group more receptive to “marketing on the go” since they are no longer spending a lot of time surfing the web, sifting through their inbox, social network, or even their direct mail as diligently as they did before children. When it comes to proximity or geo-location type of mobile marketing, again, the segment of those with children under 6 was most positive about the idea, as opposed to the “gotta have the new technology young male” as many would assume.

Since mobile marketing is still relatively new and untapped, only later will we later find out if mobile marketing receptiveness is less about the lifestage (having children under 6) and more about the generation of those who presently have children under 6? Only time (and science) will tell.

Image compliments of webcomic XKCD - http://xkcd.com/


Science is Fun!
There’s that word science again. The science behind marketing doesn’t have to be complicated. As a matter of fact, there are many solutions in the marketplace today that let you benefit from the science of others. Examples of this from Acxiom include things like “Life Event Triggers” which enable one to choose a prospect list based specifically on a recent life event like graduation, marriage, or child-birth. If your product or service is specifically relevant to people experiencing these events you can simply “subscribe” to receive lists of prospects in your area that recently “triggered” an event. Combine that with some technology and you can automate direct mail programs to effectively go “door-to-door” for you.

If your product or service does not have a clear tie to a specific life event, this is when you might use a Lifestage Segmentation system to uncover commonality in your current customer base to target new customers. Acxiom has a Lifestage Segmentation solution called PersonicX – if you follow the link you can see an interactive introduction to PersonicX. This solution segments U.S. households into 30 Lifestages that are then assigned to one of 70 Clusters. The Lifestages have cool names like “GenX Parents”, “Boomer Barons” and “Active Elders”, while the Clusters are sub-categories like “Cartoons and Carpools” or “Apple Pie Families”. Each Lifestage and Cluster is defined by a specific set of demographic variables combined with geographic and behavioral factors and represent a modern take on “birds of feather flock together”. Consumers move from one Lifestage/Cluster to another over time.

Using these types of solutions can be a very beneficial and simple way to inject some “science” into your marketing. With a simple list of your current customers you can identify the Lifestage of each with PersonicX, and chances are you will see the old 80/20 rule highlighted in a previous post come to life. There will likely be a concentration of your best customers in only a handful of Lifestages & Clusters. Based on this insight, you would be ahead of the curve if you were to then obtain a list of prospects in your trade area that are in the same Lifestages and Clusters as your best customers.

I look forward to your thoughts and feedback on using Lifestages to improve your targeting and increase response…

%d bloggers like this: