How to increase customer response with trigger-based marketing (via MySalesHero’s Blog)


I have written about this topic before, but here is another angle and great insight from my colleague, MySalesHero….

How to increase customer response with trigger-based marketing You don’t have to be a superhero to know how important it is to be in the right place at the right time. It’s the same for your marketing programs. Timing is everything. Photography services for the recently engaged. Accounting assistance for an expanding company. Lawn care services after a new home purchase. By delivering the right offer just when your customer is ready to buy, you’ll improve buyer response every time. These trigger events in yo … Read More

via MySalesHero’s Blog

With the sprouting of gray hairs…


With the sprouting of gray hairs comes the realization that life is changing. First it was the reading glasses and now the gray hairs in my beard. This got me thinking about how my life today is different from a year ago not to mention 5, 10, or 15 years ago, and how much it will continue to change in the future. Fast forward through the sentimental and philosophical and you end up with the simple notion that:

“People need stuff and that stuff changes depending on their Lifestage”.

It Doesn’t Take a Genius
Marketers have known this for years and I take no credit for pointing this out. Many have gone to great lengths to create tools and methodologies to capture new clients whose journey through life is punctuated with events that ultimately define their needs (“needs” are very subjective and a whole ‘nother story). Life events include things like getting married, buying a home, having children, getting divorced (for more than 50% of U.S. society), becoming an empty-nester, and finally becoming a senior whose only interest seems to be spoiling the grandchildren and driving with a turn signal on. Let’s just say that my neighbor and I are both buying diapers but for different reasons – talk about cradle to grave, right?

Successfully reaching these consumers and getting them to buy your product or service depends on your ability to deliver a relevant, timely and compelling message in the appropriate and desired channel, which might include direct mail, email, mobile, social, search, or display.

Lifestage + Channel
This is a topic with increasing interest as of late – just this past week I read a MediaPost article that talks specifically about marketing to new parents in the mobile space. Apparently new parents are the group most likely to be responsive to mobile marketing. Some could guess that the lifestyle of those with young children is chaotic and thus making this group more receptive to “marketing on the go” since they are no longer spending a lot of time surfing the web, sifting through their inbox, social network, or even their direct mail as diligently as they did before children. When it comes to proximity or geo-location type of mobile marketing, again, the segment of those with children under 6 was most positive about the idea, as opposed to the “gotta have the new technology young male” as many would assume.

Since mobile marketing is still relatively new and untapped, only later will we later find out if mobile marketing receptiveness is less about the lifestage (having children under 6) and more about the generation of those who presently have children under 6? Only time (and science) will tell.

Image compliments of webcomic XKCD - http://xkcd.com/


Science is Fun!
There’s that word science again. The science behind marketing doesn’t have to be complicated. As a matter of fact, there are many solutions in the marketplace today that let you benefit from the science of others. Examples of this from Acxiom include things like “Life Event Triggers” which enable one to choose a prospect list based specifically on a recent life event like graduation, marriage, or child-birth. If your product or service is specifically relevant to people experiencing these events you can simply “subscribe” to receive lists of prospects in your area that recently “triggered” an event. Combine that with some technology and you can automate direct mail programs to effectively go “door-to-door” for you.

If your product or service does not have a clear tie to a specific life event, this is when you might use a Lifestage Segmentation system to uncover commonality in your current customer base to target new customers. Acxiom has a Lifestage Segmentation solution called PersonicX – if you follow the link you can see an interactive introduction to PersonicX. This solution segments U.S. households into 30 Lifestages that are then assigned to one of 70 Clusters. The Lifestages have cool names like “GenX Parents”, “Boomer Barons” and “Active Elders”, while the Clusters are sub-categories like “Cartoons and Carpools” or “Apple Pie Families”. Each Lifestage and Cluster is defined by a specific set of demographic variables combined with geographic and behavioral factors and represent a modern take on “birds of feather flock together”. Consumers move from one Lifestage/Cluster to another over time.

Using these types of solutions can be a very beneficial and simple way to inject some “science” into your marketing. With a simple list of your current customers you can identify the Lifestage of each with PersonicX, and chances are you will see the old 80/20 rule highlighted in a previous post come to life. There will likely be a concentration of your best customers in only a handful of Lifestages & Clusters. Based on this insight, you would be ahead of the curve if you were to then obtain a list of prospects in your trade area that are in the same Lifestages and Clusters as your best customers.

I look forward to your thoughts and feedback on using Lifestages to improve your targeting and increase response…

“You Put Your Chocolate in My Peanut Butter!”


We’ve all come to love the irresistible combination of chocolate and peanut butter served to us by the folks at Reese’s and can probably name scores of other perfect combinations in nearly any context. Things like cell Phones with cameras and Gin & Tonic; or people like Sonny & Cher or Will & Grace! Not to mention the ever-present “Value Meals” and Price Fixe menus in nearly every segment of dining these days. I guess 1 + 1 does equal 3?

To this end, my blog is aptly named marketing+technology and I wanted to share with you some fine examples of how the combination of sound marketing principles with appropriate technology can yield tremendous results.

I assume you’ve read my recent post about getting reading glasses? Anyway, yesterday I received an automated phone call from the retail eyeglass location where I purchased my glasses. The computer voice on the other end of the line was a very pleasant-sounding young lady, British or Australian I think, who identified herself as calling from the store in question and asked to confirm that I was Mark Donatelli (she even pronounced it right – better than many people!) and if I was willing to answer 2 survey questions about my recent experience. After I pressed 1 (Yes) to continue, I was asked to rate my experience from 0 to 10 (10 being best) and rate my willingness to recommend them to others. After pressing my entries I was then asked to record a short message about why I rated the experience as I did. Done and Done. After this 20 second process I immediately thought “They put chocolate in the peanut butter!”.

By this, I mean that they took the solid marketing and CRM practices of:

1. Follow up with your clients after their purchase.
2. Survey your clients to measure satisfaction.
3. Ask your clients for an endorsement or quote regarding your satisfaction.
4. And as a by-product, they were also able to verify my phone number in their database.

These steps if done by a person would be time-consuming and costly, but with the injection of some technology the process is automated and efficient.

To take this a step further, I imagine that about 11 months from now I will receive a postcard reminding me to stop in and have my annual eye exam. If they were really cookin’, I might get a birthday card with a discount coupon on prescription sunglasses – we’ll have to wait and see on that one. Regardless of industry, these types of automated “campaigns” can have a positive effect on your business by deepening customer loyalty.

From a prospecting standpoint (as opposed to the CRM scenario above), the combination of technology and sound marketing principles can be even more powerful. For example, a national home improvement store might have ongoing, automated direct mail programs for New Homeowners, New Movers, Households expecting a child, or those will children headed to college. Each mail program has a creative design and content relative to the “lifestage” the recipient is experiencing. This allows the store to call attention to specific, relevant products likely needed by the recipient. Without technology to automate the data acquisition and delivery, then merging with creative and print, this would not be possible.

Imagine if Peanut Butter and Chocolate had never met? Tell me about your marketing+technology idea and let’s make it happen!

A trip in the way back machine below – 80’s commercials for Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups.

Selling to Consumers with Marketing Automation


Previously I used Las Vegas as the backdrop for what I deemed to be sure signs of the coming economic recovery – call it my own “Vegas Consumer Confidence Index”. Closer to home I am witnessing yet another sign that, despite all other indicators, there is compelling evidence that Home Services companies should continue actively marketing to consumers.

The value of Route Density to SMBs who provide Home Services
On most weekday mornings (and some weekends), shortly after 7:00 AM, I am greeted by the hum and thrashing of lawn mowers as one of five (5), yes five, different landscaping crews descend on my neighborhood to cut, edge, and trim every living plant in sight. I do not live in a gated community or otherwise “affluent” neighborhood, which brings these questions to mind:

Question: As American savings rates are off the charts and middle class consumers have cut back on most discretionary spending, what makes Home Services businesses like lawn care or pool cleaning continue to be viable?

Answer: I think this can be summed up by saying that “consumers, regardless of the economy, will continue to pay for work that needs done if the work is either difficult, undesirable, or requires special tools and skilled labor”. I know I fall into this category.

Question: Why are there 5 different companies serving my small corner of the world, when “owning a neighborhood” or having “route density” is not only more profitable for these businesses, but the green thing to do as well?

Answer: Imagine the reduction in fuel costs and transportation time if a crew could work in a single area all day. Way back when I worked for a budding lawn service (I passed on “investing” and now the guy is in early retirement with 25 crews in a 2 county area, but that’s another story) we typically spent our morning in one neighborhood and our afternoons in another. We were able to mow twice as many yards if we could stay put in a single area.

These principles hold true for companies providing any type of service delivered at or in a consumer’s home, whether one-time like decorating, home improvement, or closet systems or recurring like pool cleaning, lawn care, pest control, and housekeeping.

SMBs selling to Consumers can Generate New Business with Automation
In the past, many Home Services crews have been known to put a sign in the yard, blanket the neighborhood with door hangers, or even resort to dropping a clear plastic baggie with a business card and some gravel at the end of my driveway (now that’s bootstappin’). These approaches are all attempting to accomplish the same thing – enter the Utopia of multiple clients in the same neighborhood, and in some cases do a decent job. The rub with these methods are:

1.) With Yard Signs, exposure is limited to only those that pass the house, and is not specifically targeted or personalized. And there is a limited life span – the sign will not be there very long.

2.) While door hangers can be personalized and targeted if a data source is put in the mix, most don;t put forth the effort and door hangers do require some additional effort or costs to have the hangers distributed. A third party can distribute them for a fee likely bundled in the overall cost of printing, or the business can have workers perform this task, but aren’t they better used actually serving customers?

3.) At first glance, the clear plastic baggie with a business card and stones seems like a clever solution since the crew can just drive around and drop the bags on driveways as they pass through the neighborhood, but I would argue that the cost of the bag, fuel, time, business card, and the labor to assemble these “kits” combined with the lack of personalization and targeting and the poor brand image that might result, make this an unattractive option for entrepeneurs with their sights set on growth.

Set it and Forget it
Made famous by Ron Popeil, this direct response anthem for his Showtime Rotisserie Grill has a place in consumer marketing through the use of high quality data and automated marketing solutions. Imagine if each and every single-family homeowner in a neighborhood were to receive a full color, personalized postcard with a compelling offer, within a 2 days of a Home Services crew being in the neighborhood, then several more times over the next few months, long after the crew has left – AUTOMATICALLY. As you know in marketing, with frequency, recall and ultimately response, improves. The mechanisms that support this would be the Home Services business providing the addresses of their customers on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis, from which a mailing list of the neighbors would be produced and queued for automated mailing.

An extension of this concept can be deployed using what we call Trigger Data, such as New Homeowners or New Movers. These segments of the population are ripe for services as they settle in to their new digs. In the case of New Homeowners, they are credit worthy and ready to decorate, fix up, and furnish their new home. I have even seen the use the birth month of a consumer to trigger an automated offer mailing in the month prior. The possibilities are endless!

My favorite is a “have you seen this car” postcard featuring an image of the same make, model and color of a vehicle recently purchased by a neighbor. The card goes on to talk about the low prices, incentives, and the great deal my “neighbor” got at the dealership. Good stuff.

Here is a great video featuring my colleague, MySalesHero, as he helps a contractor apply these principles…

I look forward to your comments or questions.

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