If the World is Flat, why do you need a Sherpa?


Flat Earth Sherpa

By now, I am sure you all have read The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Friedman?  If you haven’t read this book yet, I highly recommend you read it right away – it will change the way you think about the future that is already here.  With that said, the basic premise that I took away from the book in a single sentence is that technology has essentially “flattened” the  Earth by enabling real-time collaboration on a global basis. The concept of a small manufacturer in India, sourcing raw materials in China, perhaps on Alibaba, with funding via micro loan from the UK, and selling finished goods on eBay to an American consumer is now a reality.

This is where the irony enters.

This new flat Earth has been a tremendous enabler for small and medium-sized businesses, but has muddied the waters for much larger companies.  I spend a great deal of my time consulting with some of the world’s largest and most recognizable consumer brands, and for the most part these companies recognize and are actively trying to exploit this new flat Earth, but frankly they have no idea how to choose the best countries for expansion, how to maximize growth for those countries they are already in, and in either case, how to navigate the myriad of technology, data, cultural, legal and consumer privacy challenges.

Hence, the need for a Sherpa (hint: ME).

If your company or if you have a client that is facing these types of Global Expansion challenges in this new flat earth, please let me know – I can lead the way.

It has been a while since I have posted an article, and I certainly have no shortage of topics to write about; the fact remains that  I simply do not have enough time in the day.  And to add insult to injury, my travel schedule and client load keeps me flush with article ideas, but  no time to write about them.  I actually did some of the final editing for this post on my new iPhone 4 (more on that in future articles) while my son drank his milk and watched Little Einsteins from my lap!

Anyway, thanks for stopping by and keep your eyes open for a few rapid-fire posts over the next week or so – having not written in a while, they will be based on my travels and observations over the last couple of months.  Don’t forget to leave your comments and provide feedback.

Thank you for reading and Happy Hunting!

What’s worse? ‘Kids Today’ or Client Expectations?


 

Little Rock Arkansas

Image compliments of Little Rock Beautiful Comission

 

I know I have not posted lately, but I have been traveling a lot.  As a matter of fact, I just returned home from Little Rock, Arkansas and my trip, as well as a brief conversation with some strangers on the last night, were the catalysts I needed to write this! 

My last night in town it was raining, and as I made way back to The Peabody,  I was ducking (no pun intended) under storefront awnings and doorways to avoid getting drenched.  I was half way to the hotel and as I popped into a doorway, there were a couple of “dudes” in their early twenties standing there.   Small talk ensued, mostly with the shorter one.  They appeared to be a gang of two; the shorter one did all of the talking and the other always looked at the leader before speaking when he did.  The leader asked me what I did for a living.  At the risk of confusing them (sometimes it is not crystal clear even to me), I simply said ‘I’m a consultant”.  He followed with “What’s that?” and I told him “I give people my opinion”.   Now the quiet one pipes up and asks “You can get paid for that?!” with his eyes wide open.  Now the simple conversation turned into more of a Magic 8 Ball session – they asked me about all of the secrets of the universe, as if I were the Dhali Lamba himself.  The last question came – “How much money can you make buying stocks?” he asks.  I tried to explain it was a matter of the amount invested, the stock, and the time period – but mostly luck.  The short one said “How much can I make if I buy $1,000 in stock?” – “It depends” I say, “But it wouldn’t be hard to get 10% in return over some time period”.  He then asks “How much is that?”. 

As I dash into the rain, running from the fear that I would get dumber if I stood there any longer, I was thinking to myself what every generation before me has thought, “What is it with kids today?”.  

This brings me to wondering what’s worse – “kids today” or client expectations?  Let me explain. 

Stethoscope

Image compliments of the Fordham University Blog

 

On a regular basis, I work with many of the most sophisticated and successful companies in the world, and I am amazed at how often they come to my company with a sincere desire to improve what they’re doing, yet when we ask them direct questions about their business challenges and other details that are variables that will dramatically affect our ability to help them, not to mention our price, they refuse to answer.  They just keep asking us “When can you provide a solution and how much will it cost?”  That’s like going to a doctor and telling her you that don’t feel well, but then not answering any of her questions about your symptoms or letting her examine you.

How can we prescribe a solution if you don’t describe the symptom?

Not sure which is worse – what do you think?

How to increase customer response with trigger-based marketing (via MySalesHero’s Blog)


I have written about this topic before, but here is another angle and great insight from my colleague, MySalesHero….

How to increase customer response with trigger-based marketing You don’t have to be a superhero to know how important it is to be in the right place at the right time. It’s the same for your marketing programs. Timing is everything. Photography services for the recently engaged. Accounting assistance for an expanding company. Lawn care services after a new home purchase. By delivering the right offer just when your customer is ready to buy, you’ll improve buyer response every time. These trigger events in yo … Read More

via MySalesHero’s Blog

With the sprouting of gray hairs…


With the sprouting of gray hairs comes the realization that life is changing. First it was the reading glasses and now the gray hairs in my beard. This got me thinking about how my life today is different from a year ago not to mention 5, 10, or 15 years ago, and how much it will continue to change in the future. Fast forward through the sentimental and philosophical and you end up with the simple notion that:

“People need stuff and that stuff changes depending on their Lifestage”.

It Doesn’t Take a Genius
Marketers have known this for years and I take no credit for pointing this out. Many have gone to great lengths to create tools and methodologies to capture new clients whose journey through life is punctuated with events that ultimately define their needs (“needs” are very subjective and a whole ‘nother story). Life events include things like getting married, buying a home, having children, getting divorced (for more than 50% of U.S. society), becoming an empty-nester, and finally becoming a senior whose only interest seems to be spoiling the grandchildren and driving with a turn signal on. Let’s just say that my neighbor and I are both buying diapers but for different reasons – talk about cradle to grave, right?

Successfully reaching these consumers and getting them to buy your product or service depends on your ability to deliver a relevant, timely and compelling message in the appropriate and desired channel, which might include direct mail, email, mobile, social, search, or display.

Lifestage + Channel
This is a topic with increasing interest as of late – just this past week I read a MediaPost article that talks specifically about marketing to new parents in the mobile space. Apparently new parents are the group most likely to be responsive to mobile marketing. Some could guess that the lifestyle of those with young children is chaotic and thus making this group more receptive to “marketing on the go” since they are no longer spending a lot of time surfing the web, sifting through their inbox, social network, or even their direct mail as diligently as they did before children. When it comes to proximity or geo-location type of mobile marketing, again, the segment of those with children under 6 was most positive about the idea, as opposed to the “gotta have the new technology young male” as many would assume.

Since mobile marketing is still relatively new and untapped, only later will we later find out if mobile marketing receptiveness is less about the lifestage (having children under 6) and more about the generation of those who presently have children under 6? Only time (and science) will tell.

Image compliments of webcomic XKCD - http://xkcd.com/


Science is Fun!
There’s that word science again. The science behind marketing doesn’t have to be complicated. As a matter of fact, there are many solutions in the marketplace today that let you benefit from the science of others. Examples of this from Acxiom include things like “Life Event Triggers” which enable one to choose a prospect list based specifically on a recent life event like graduation, marriage, or child-birth. If your product or service is specifically relevant to people experiencing these events you can simply “subscribe” to receive lists of prospects in your area that recently “triggered” an event. Combine that with some technology and you can automate direct mail programs to effectively go “door-to-door” for you.

If your product or service does not have a clear tie to a specific life event, this is when you might use a Lifestage Segmentation system to uncover commonality in your current customer base to target new customers. Acxiom has a Lifestage Segmentation solution called PersonicX – if you follow the link you can see an interactive introduction to PersonicX. This solution segments U.S. households into 30 Lifestages that are then assigned to one of 70 Clusters. The Lifestages have cool names like “GenX Parents”, “Boomer Barons” and “Active Elders”, while the Clusters are sub-categories like “Cartoons and Carpools” or “Apple Pie Families”. Each Lifestage and Cluster is defined by a specific set of demographic variables combined with geographic and behavioral factors and represent a modern take on “birds of feather flock together”. Consumers move from one Lifestage/Cluster to another over time.

Using these types of solutions can be a very beneficial and simple way to inject some “science” into your marketing. With a simple list of your current customers you can identify the Lifestage of each with PersonicX, and chances are you will see the old 80/20 rule highlighted in a previous post come to life. There will likely be a concentration of your best customers in only a handful of Lifestages & Clusters. Based on this insight, you would be ahead of the curve if you were to then obtain a list of prospects in your trade area that are in the same Lifestages and Clusters as your best customers.

I look forward to your thoughts and feedback on using Lifestages to improve your targeting and increase response…

“Have you seen my glasses?”


Glasses Graphic With the obvious evidence that I was actually growing older, I finally accepted my fate and was recently fitted for a pair of “reading” glasses. Now and for evermore, the phrase “have you seen my glasses” will be part of my vernacular.

This got me thinking about how many businesses out there have been putting off “getting glasses” when it comes to looking closely at their customers and prospects. Or, for those that do have glasses, when was the last time they had the prescription checked and adjusted? In one of my previous articles, “Who are your best customers“, I explored the ways to take a closer look at your customers and why it’s important to do so regularly.

Over the years, I have spoken with many business owners and sales & marketing leaders, and I have found that the smaller the company, the more likely it is that they have not recently examined their customers (and have no plans to do so!). I find this interesting because the small business is probably the least likely to afford marketing to the wrong audience.

Building on the concepts I discussed in “Who are your best customers“, I am writing an article on calculating the Return on Marketing Investment (ROMI)and would like to hear your answers to the question “How do you decide how and what to spend on marketing?”

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